Shrek: The Musical Audition Packet

Audition Packet

Dear Potential Cast Member,

First, we would like to thank you for your interest in auditioning for HHS’s production of Shrek: The Musical. Please read these pages very carefully so that you have all of the information regarding auditions, rehearsals and the show. There are important audition tips here on this page, so read and take note before your audition! We are so excited to be directing this amazing show and bringing it to life on the James Barr stage. Our entire production team is committed to making this production an experience that the cast, crews and volunteers, as well as audiences will not forget.

As a helpful guide to characterization and acting, we encourage everyone to watch the Original Broadway Cast perform SHREK on stage! It is available on NETFLIX or you can find it on Vimeo with a simple Google search.

Shrek the Musical is an extremely character-driven show featuring a number of fairytale creatures we all know and love. Don’t be afraid to throw yourself into the character you’re auditioning for; you can’t go too far! Character voices and dialects are necessary for the creative team to make casting and callback decisions, so make sure you commit to everything you do during your audition!

During your audition, please do not dress up like a character. If you do, you’re telling the creative team who you think you should be. Dress to help you feel the part you’re auditioning for by wearing shoes similar to a character so your posture is similar, wearing a dress if the character wears a dress, dressing IN THE STYLE of a character or the show.  However, please refrain from wearing a costume, which can diminish the artistic team’s creativity of seeing you in other roles you may not have seen for yourself.

When you’re singing, whether it be for your initial audition or for callbacks, the most important thing to keep in mind is that acting and intentions are everything. There is a reason you don’t see pop stars winning Tony Awards on Broadway. It’s not about how you sound, it’s about why you’re singing, what you’re singing for and what you’re trying to accomplish thru the music. When a musical breaks into song, it is because of the actor’s heightened emotion. Whether it be good or bad, the actor has reached a point where speaking dialogue is no longer an option: the only thing they can do is sing. Keep that in mind when you’re preparing for auditions or callbacks. This is one of the most common mistakes in theatre, even with professional actors at the highest levels!

During your audition, be sure to focus on a point ABOVE the heads of the directors. Sing to your invisible scene partner, not us. This will keep you in the moment and eliminate worry. DO NOT TRY TO READ INTO THE DIRECTORS’ ODD FACIAL EXPRESSIONS. This is not helpful and can send you in a panic.  Figg makes the oddest faces during auditions, and Ms. Houge is making faces at her piano playing not you. Relax and do your thing!

We know schedules are hectic, and you may have conflicts with club sports, dance, 4N6, HHS clubs, vacations, etc. Please take the time to list all conflicts on the audition form. When one cast member is missing from rehearsal, it affects the others in the show, the productivity of rehearsals, and ultimately, the final product! Conflicts are a huge part when considering roles for cast members.

Make sure you take note of everything in this packet, as it will help to answer any questions you may have. Also, please fill out the forms in this packet and make sure to bring them to your audition! We are so excited to be given the opportunity to help bring this amazing show to life here at Homestead! Shrek will prove to be one of the biggest shows in the history of Homestead School Theatre, and our entire production team is committed to making it an experience that volunteers and audiences won’t soon forget.

– Amelia Figg-Franzoi and Kristen Houge (Directors of Shrek The Musical)


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